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Stamford, CT United States green card lawyer

The U.S. immigration process to become a legal resident is among the most complicated in the world. Those people who want to come to the United States for education, health reasons, work, or to be with family have many hurdles to overcome. The process to become a lawful permanent resident and get a Green Card can be particularly tedious. When applying for a Green Card, many applicants feel left in the dark as to what stage their application is in. This can cause undue stress to honest people who want to come to the United States and contribute to American society. Thankfully, those immigrants who apply for a Green Card have a way to check on the progress of their application.

My Case Status System

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) provides an electronic system for checking on the status of a Green Card application called “My Case Status.” This is an online program that can be accessed from any personal computer or mobile device. By going to the My Case Status webpage and entering in the case receipt number (a number that includes three letters followed by 10 digits), a person can view the most recent notifications regarding his or her application. However, it is important to note there can be a delay in notifications shown on the system.

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How Can I Sponsor My Niece or Nephew for U.S. Immigration and Permanent Residency?There are several ways that an American citizen can help a niece or nephew immigrate to the U.S. and obtain a green card, also known as lawful permanent resident (LPR) status. Unfortunately, there is no immediate relative or family preference visa category that allows you to directly sponsor their immigration. Rather, you must consider one of these more circuitous routes:

1. Adopt an orphaned niece or nephew under age 16, making them an immediate relative.

The immediate relative (IR) category allows for the quickest path to immigration, as there are no annual limits on the number of IR visas. The IR category is available to the following relatives of a US citizen:

  • Your parent;
  • Your spouse;
  • Your unmarried child under age 21; or
  • An orphan under age 16 whom you have adopted outside the U.S. or will adopt once they reach the U.S.

2. Sponsor the parent of your niece or nephew for a family preference visa.

The family preference visa category allows U.S. citizens age 21 and older to sponsor the immigration of their siblings, subject to an annual quota of 65,000. The sibling petition can include the sibling’s spouse and minor children under age 21. 

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Darien immigration deportation attorneyIn 2017 and 2018, the U.S. news media focused a lot of attention on the deportation efforts of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). But do the statistics actually support the idea that the average documented immigrant awaiting permanent resident or citizenship status should be seriously concerned about the possibility of being deported?

ICE Administrative Arrest Statistics for 2018

In fiscal year 2018 (the 12 months ending on October 8, 2018), ICE made 158,581 administrative arrests, meaning that the arrested individual had committed a civil violation of U.S. immigration laws. However, most of these individuals were not merely in violation of immigration laws; they were also guilty of criminal violations. 66% were convicted criminals, 21% had pending criminal charges, and 3% had previously issued final orders for deportation. Only 10% of these arrests involved people who had committed only a civil violation of immigration laws, such as overstaying a visa or entering the country illegally.

The total number of administrative arrests increased from 110,104 in 2016 to 158,581 in 2018, an increase of 44 percent over two years. The increase in arrests was heavily skewed toward the category of people who had pending criminal charges, indicating that ICE has stepped up enforcement against individuals who have been charged with a crime but not yet convicted. However, many of these people had prior criminal convictions. Among the most common crimes committed by arrestees were driving under the influence, drug possession, and assault. 

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Posted on in Green Cards

Stamford green card attorneyIf you are a foreign citizen currently living in the United States, you may be thinking about applying for an adjustment of status (AOS) using Form I-485. If your AOS application is approved, you will be given a green card, and you will be able to live and work in the U.S. for as long as you want.

In our last post, we explained the requirements to qualify for a green card. However, even if you meet all of the qualification criteria, your application could still be denied. In this post, we will explain some of the reasons why U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) might deny an AOS application. 

Reasons for Denial of an Adjustment of Status

Here are some of the common reasons that the USCIS might deny your AOS application:

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